Practice Kaizen

Continuous improvement—the Japanese call it kaizen—offers some of the best insurance for both your career and the organization. Kaizen (pronounced ky’zen) is the relentless quest for a better way, for higher quality craftsmanship. Think of it as the daily pursuit of perfection.

Kaizen keeps you reaching, stretching to outdo yesterday. The continuous improvements may come bit by bit. But enough of these small, incremental gains will eventually add up to a valuable competitive advantage. Also, if every employee constantly keeps an eye out for improvements, major innovations are more likely to occur. The spirit of kaizen can trigger dramatic breakthroughs.

PDCA- Plan, Do, Check and Adjust or Act.  Making corrections in your daily actions will yield the best results.  Make a plan, excute the plan, check the results and if necessary, take corrective action to acheive the result you want.

The dictionary definition is: Kaizen (改善?), Japanese for “improvement” or “change for the better”, refers to philosophy or practices that focus upon continuous improvement of processes in manufacturing, engineering, supporting business processes, and management. It has been applied in healthcare,[1] psychotherapy,[2] life-coaching, government, banking, and many other industries.

When used in the business sense and applied to the workplace, kaizen refers to activities that continually improve all functions.  Kaizen was first implemented in several Japanese businesses after the Second World War, influenced in part by American business and quality management teachers who visited the country. It has since spread throughout the world[4] and is now being implemented in many other venues besides just business and productivity.

Some elements of kaizen are:

Teamwork, Personal discipline, Improved morale, Quality circles, Suggestions for improvement.

Practice Kaizen everyday and you will continue to acheive your goals and dreams.  Personal development is key.  Are you practicing Kaizen?

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